Women’s Packing list for Camino de Santiago

It feels like a decade ago since this walk.

As I start to tentatively fantasize about local backpacking adventures for the PNW summer (that is very far away) I looked back to what I packed for the Camino. It will probably be a very long while before it’s safe to travel, let alone walk a Camino again. But we can look at photos and research and daydream for now.

A lot of people will say you need a 40-65L pack for this walk. If you plan to camp, then sure. If you plan to stay in hostels/albergues along the way, no way do you need a pack that big. I packed everything into an Osprey Kyte 36L backpack. It’s a hideously ugly pink pack and totally comfortable. That baby and I were fused for 550 miles. Less is really more on this. Unless you’re camping, it shouldn’t be hard to keep the weight of your pack down. I didn’t obsess over weighing every ounce that I packed or rip out the pages of my guidebook as I walked. But carry the absolute least amount of shit possible. If you can stuff everything into a 30L pack — even better! Trust me, your knees will thank you.

I met one woman with a very small daypack who had walked the Camino several times and now carried “Half the weight for twice the price.” If you can afford lighter weight, fancier stuff, go for it. For the rest of us, I am a big advocate for taking what you already have.

I walked from mid-August through the end of September. Six weeks total from St Jean Pied de Port to Finisterre. It was blazing hot in August. September was really pleasant — cool at night and in the mornings — very cold on some of the rainy, mountain pass days — but otherwise sunny and grand.

Packing List:

  • Merrell’s trail running shoes
  • 3 shirts, all synthetic – 1 tank top, 1 t-shirt, 1 long sleeve
  • 3 pairs underwear (no cotton!) + 3 pairs of socks – 2 wool, 1 with wool exterior and polyester interior
  • 1 pair roll up pants
  • 1 pair stretchy polyester shorts
  • 1 sports bra
  • Lightweight Marmot rain jacket and pants
  • Long rimmed floppy hat
  • Flip Flops
  • Fleece jacket
  • Tiny microfiber towel
  • Tiny bag of toiletries (with first aid stuff)
  • Journal and pens
  • Brierley’s Guidebook
  • Lightweight sleeping bag
  • Phone + charger
  • Water bottle
  • Earplugs – for the love of god bring the best you can get. Roncadores (snorers) in the albergues will destroy your sanity otherwise.
  • Waterproof liner for the inside of backpack — it will rain, this will keep your stuff dry
  • Splurge item: a pillow case
  • Walking stick — I bought this for 10 euro in Spain. I will never, ever go on a long distance walk without one. It saved my knees so many times going downhill. My first day walking I foolishly didn’t buy one because I thought walking sticks were for old people with knee problems. And I was twenty-nine. Nope. Young and dumb. My knees SCREAMED at me on the steep descent to Roncesvalles on day one. I bought a walking stick the second I got there. SHUT YOUR EGO UP AND TAKE A WALKING STICK.

Things I bought when the weather turned cold in September:

Warm beanie hat, scarf, gloves, and leggings

I was always afraid of running out of snacks, because hiker hunger is real and I couldn’t seem to get enough in me. I carried far more food on a daily basis than was necessary. You’re passing through towns every few miles so there’s rarely a time when you’ll be far from a food source.

Snacks I carried too much of but love for walking through Spain:

  • Tuna, tuna, and more tuna. Tins of it are drenched in olive oil. Add a baguette and some fresh tomatoes and you got a right fine lunch.
  • A tiny bottle of olive oil — ridiculous to carry. But delicious on everything.
  • Dark chocolate. Duh.
  • Avellana (hazelnut) bars and juice boxes for breakfast snacks (Fruits of the Forest or OJ)
  • Tiny tangerines
  • Digestive biscuits — I was never without a roll of these in my pack. I grew up on them so I felt like my childhood from growing up in Madrid was also sustaining me. The best ones have a smear of milk chocolate on them. Great dunked in coffee. Or when you’re really cranky in the morning. Or when you need an afternoon push because it’s so rainy and cold and you just need something sweet to get you through.

Then there are hopes and fears that will add weight to your pack on a long distance walk, arguably more than the physical stuff we carry. But hopefully the fear part of that load lightens as you go. Stay safe and Buen Camino when the time comes one day!

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